Photo Lucky Dube black and white photo shot by Floyd Celluloyd for Innermann a decade of reggae photography. Please respect the copyright. Do not use the photos without written permission.
 

Lucky Dube photo

 
  • Spread the word of love

    Tell a Friend

Please help to fulfill my dream

Your donation helps me to get 500 copies of the "Innermann" project printed as a book. Please consider a donation. Give thanks to every supporter of the project. You send me hope. Jah Jah light all time.

Black & white reggae pictures

Black and white photography is the purest form of expression to me. No freaky colours, just reducing the photo to the maximum. Photography and Reggae is my perfect personal combination. It is a mental ting. Be convinced of what you do and you will receive your reward one day.

With a little donation you can become a supporter of the project. That helps me to get all the pictures published in a book.

If you think you want to become the sponsor of the project just get in contact with me. Different forms of sponsorships are possible. Any help is appreciated to fulfill my dream. Jah bless.

Most liked photos

Filed under

Reggae

Tags

Lucky Dube

Rest in Peace Lucky Dube
August 3, 1964 - † October 18, 2007

Lucky Dube was born in Ermelo, formerly of the Eastern Transvaal, now of Mpumalanga, on August 3, 1964. His parents separated before his birth and he was raised by his mother, Sarah, who named him because she considered his birth fortunate after a number of failed pregnancies. Along with his two siblings, Thandi and Patrick, Dube spent much of his childhood with his grandmother, while his mother relocated to work. In a 1999 interview he described his grandmother as "his greatest love" who "multiplied many things to bring up this responsible individual that I am today."

As a child Dube worked as a gardener but, as he matured, realizing that he wasn't earning enough to feed his family, he began to attend school. There he joined a choir and, with some friends, formed his first musical ensemble, called The Skyway Band. While at school he discovered the Rastafari movement. At the age of 18 Dube joined his cousin's band, The Love Brothers, playing Zulu pop music known as mbaqanga whilst funding his lifestyle by working for Hole and Cooke as a security guard at the car auctions in Midrand. The band signed with Teal Record Company, under Richard Siluma (Teal was later incorporated into Gallo Record Company). Though Dube was still at school, the band recorded material in Johannesburg during his school holidays. The resultant album was released under the name Lucky Dube and the Supersoul. The second album was released soon afterwards, and this time Dube wrote some of the lyrics in addition to singing. It was around this same time when he began to learn English.

On the release of his fifth Mbaqanga album, Dave Segal (who became Dube's sound engineer) encouraged him to drop the "Supersoul" element of the name. All subsequent albums were recorded as Lucky Dube. At this time Dube began to note fans were responding positively to some reggae songs he played during live concerts. Drawing inspiration from Jimmy Cliff and Peter Tosh, he felt the socio-political messages associated with Jamaican reggae were relevant to a South African audience in an institutionally racist society.

He decided to try the new musical genre and in 1984, released the mini album Rastas Never Die. The record sold poorly - around 4000 units - in comparison to the 30,000 units his mbaqanga records would sell. Keen to suppress anti-apartheid activism, the apartheid regime banned the album in 1985. However, he was not discouraged and continued to perform the reggae tracks live and wrote and produced a second reggae album. Think About The Children (1985). It achieved platinum sales status and established Dube as a popular reggae artist in South Africa, in addition to attracting attention outside his homeland. In August 1998 Lucky embarked on a six week tour of the United States with Shaggy, Buju Banton, Steel Pulse and Beres Hammond on the "Spirit of Unity2 tour.

On October 18, 2007, Lucky Dube was killed in the Johannesburg suburb of Rosettenville shortly after dropping two of his seven children off at their uncle's house. Dube was driving his Chrysler 300C which the assailants were apparently after. Police reports suggest he was shot dead by carjackers. Five men have been arrested in connection with the murder. Three men were tried and found guilty on March 31, 2009; two of the men attempted to escape and were caught. The men were sentenced to life in prison. He is survived by his wife, Zanele, and his seven children.

Information taken from wikipedia

More great photos like this one...

One of my favourite tunes

Leave a Comment

 

It is my passion to take reggae pictures, ska and dancehall photos. Sometimes it is difficult to show each personal moment when a photo was taken, but I hope you enjoy your stay here while watching reggae photos of different musicians like: The Abyssinians, Aswad, Beres Hammond, Black Uhuru, Burning Spear, Cocoa Tea, Culture, Dawn Penn, Desmond Dekker, Everton Blender, George Nooks, Glen Washington, Horace Andy, Israel Vibration, Junior Kelly, Junior Reid, Luciano, Lucky Dube, Prezident Brown, Sugar Minott and a lot more. All pictures are © protected 2010 Innermann a decade of reggae photography - photos by Floyd Celluloyd